#Storycraft Topic: “Thy Reader, Thy King”

In her book, It was the Best of Sentences, it was the Worst of Sentences, June Casagrande gives is an interesting reason to learn our fundamentals:

“If you want to master the art of the sentence, you must first accept a somewhat unpleasant truth – one a lot of writers would rather deny: The Reader is King. You are his servant. You serve the Reader information. You serve the Reader entertainment…Only by knowing your place can you do your job well….

Here’s another way to think of this: Your writing is not about you. It’s about the Reader. Even when it’s quite literally about you – in memoirs, personal essays, first-person accounts – it’s not about you…

When you forget the Reader, you get what I call writer-serving writing. It exists at every level of writing expertise. I’ve gagged on it when reading personal essays and caught whiffs of it in award-winning books and articles. I’ve been horrified to find it in my own writing. Writer-serving writing is perfectly appropriate in diaries and journals – but any writing that’s meant to be seen by a Reader must serve the Reader”

This week in #storycraft, I’d like to discuss what you think of this theory, and whether you think it applies not just to the art of the sentence but to any other, or all of the elements of the art of crafting fiction.

Comments

3 comments on “#Storycraft Topic: “Thy Reader, Thy King””
  1. This was my first #storycraft chat. Great fun. Are their requirements for being listed with the Storycraft Writers?

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    1. It was lovely to meet you today 🙂 If you mean the pictures of #storycrafters in the sidebar, you just have to follow #story_Craft 🙂 We have a facebook page, too, which is quite new. Do like us there and feel free to comment – or join our goodread books and add writing books for us to read.

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  2. Anonymous says:

    […] he doesn’t accept his place as subservient to the Reader. I posted some quotes from the section here and asked everyone to give it a quick skim at the beginning of the […]

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